Przejdź do głównej zawartości

Scrum? Yes, I'll have one, please!

There is one of those soft skills training like "Conflict management" or "Team building". The trainer is a woman with psychological background. After the usual part that is delivered during every soft skills training (and, surprisingly, this part is almost always the same on every training) there is a break. The trainer asks people what they do in their job and it may well be that she is really interested in what people say, or maybe she's just pretending. Regardless, she goes like this:

- Could you tell me more about this Scrum thing you mentioned? How do you do it exactly?

One of the trainees feels he's the one who must speak up:

- Well, we meet every day at 9:00 and we talk briefly what we did yesterday and what we have to do today and whether anyone has any obstacles. This is called "stand-up". Also, the whole project is divided into a number of short periods called iterations and there is the planning at the beginning of each and (...)

The trainer is impressed:

- Wow, that sounds like a great idea! I just wonder... could that Scrum thing be used in another sort of business, not necessarily software?

And then there is the key turn of action: the trainee ponders for a while... some more... OK, the neurons have worked out the answer:

- Hmmm.... in general yes, you can. I think you could well adapt it to another domain.

- Oh my, that is so great! I have to sell this idea to the marketing team I have a training with this week!

Let's stop the story here. Scrum is a framework for producing software. Agile Manifesto has been written with software in mind. There is NO evidence that these things would effectively work in, or could be applied to, any other kind of business. Sorry, no. As professionals working in the software business we should not be deceiving people from other businesses that this is something they can use as well.


Popularne posty z tego bloga

Unit Testing code with IO file operations (in Python)

We may often come across a piece of code that was written without Unit Tests at all. In addition, the piece of code may be dealing with IO like file writing and reading, which makes it more difficult to Unit Test it when we are trying to refactor and modify. Let's suppose the code in question looks like this:

def writeInitialsToFile(filename, name, surname):
    initials = name[0] + '.' + surname[0] + '.'
    with open(filename, 'w') as file:

def readInitials(filename):
    initials = None
    with open(filename, 'r') as file:
        initials = file.readline()
    return initials

A straightforward and bad idea would be to write a couple of Unit Tests that make use of a real file and simply test the reading and writing. Is therea a better way to test this code?

First of all, we need a way to replace the real file with something else. For both reading and writing we will now have a couple of functions, one that expects a stream fo…

Piotr's Less Obvious Advice on Google Mock: State maintenance

Google Mock provides several ways to maintain state inside mock objects. One way of implementing state maintenance is with SaveArg. Consider the following example.

We have a class Configurator, which allows a caller to set and get values of a parameter:

class Configurator

    virtual ~Configurator() {}

    virtual void setParamX(int n) = 0;
    virtual int getParamX() = 0;

And we have a class Client that calls Configurator's methods and it also has a method incParamXBy, that can be used to increase the current value of paramX by a certain value.

class Client

    Client(Configurator & cfg);
    virtual ~Client() {}

    void setParamX(int n);
    void incParamXBy(int n);
    int getParamX();


    Configurator & _cfg;

incParamXBy internally calls setParamX and getParamX on Configurator:

void Client::incParamXBy(int n)
    _cfg.setParamX(_cfg.getParamX() + n);

Let's assume that the initial value of paramX is A and that we want to increase paramX by…

Piotr's Less Obvious Advice on Google Mock: Returning new objects from a mock

Google Mock provides a way to return newly created objects from a mock method. Suppose we have a  Generator class that is supposed to generate new objects when createNewRecord method is called:

class Generator
    virtual ~Generator() {}
    virtual Record * createNewRecord() = 0;

...and suppose we want to mock this class:

class MockGenerator : public Generator
    MOCK_METHOD0(createNewRecord, Record * ());

Suppose the caller class Client has run method defined as follows:

void Client::run()
    for(int i = 0; i < 3; i++)
        rec_tab[i] = gen.createNewRecord();

We want the mock to return a pointer to a new object each time createNewRecord is called. This is how we can express this in the test code:

TEST(ClientTest, CanRun)
    MockGenerator gen;
    Client c(gen);

    EXPECT_CALL(gen, createNewRecord())
                 //this is equivalent of returning new Record(1,2,3)